Research shows that many physicians have “jargon oblivion,” the use of terms not clearly understood by patients, as much as 70 times per encounter. So while you may believe you're communicating clearly with patients, they might not agree. For example, “PACU,” “ventilator,” and “acute pain” are terms you may think patients understand, but most do not. Helping anesthesiologists recognize how the terms we often use can prevent patients from understanding important information is one of the three topics covered in a new ASA continuing medical education (CME) course.

The complimentary three-module course, worth 1.5 credit hours, is based on ASA's Enhancing Patient Communications Program (EPCP) toolkit, which you may have read about in the Monitor last year or learned about at the ADVANCE 2023 meeting in Orlando, Florida. The EPCP toolkit was developed by the Committee on Communications (COC) as part of ASA's Made for This Moment campaign to...

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