It is known that medical education can impact student and resident mental health and wellness. As cited in academic medical literature, the influence this stress has on medical student and resident performance contributes to the increasing prevalence of depression and suicidal ideation among trainees, in addition to burnout and a lower quality of life than age-matched populations (Acad Med 2009;84:236-41; JAMA 2016;316:2214-36; JAMA 2010;304:1181-90). Many early initiatives have focused on improving access to mental health resources, reducing the stigma of receiving treatment, and education; however, identifying the individual and variable nature of mental health and wellness resources is needed in medical education (Acad Med 2014;89:573-7).

Specifically, anesthesiologists are faced with a multitude of complex challenges in their daily lives while being specialized care providers. In a repeated cross-sectional survey of burnout, distress, and depression among anesthesiology residents and first-year graduates, Sun et al. illustrated...

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