Though frequently and incorrectly conflated with hospice or end-of-life care, palliative care is comprehensive, interprofessional care with the goal of improving the quality of life for seriously ill patients and their family members, regardless of diagnosis or prognosis.1,2 Palliative care was recognized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in 2006, boarding was first offered in 2008 by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and it is recognized by 10 other specialty boarding organizations, including the American Board of Anesthesiology. Palliative care practice is composed of: 1) attentive symptom management, 2) psychosocial support of patients and their family members, and 3) expert communication to help patients and their families prioritize goals and values, particularly while accounting for limitations inherent to the serious illness and/or its treatment. Palliative care can be provided not only by trained subspecialists (i.e., “specialty palliative care”) but also by primary, front-line clinicians (i.e., “primary...

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