Central venous access in humans dates back to the early 20th century. Although no clinical applications were known at the time. Almost two decades later, in 1929, Forssmann accessed a cadaver heart (Acta Anaesthesiol Scand Suppl 1985;81:7-10). Before the 1970s, most central venous catheters were inserted through peripheral extremity veins. Internal jugular venous access became popular in the 1980s (Acta Anaesthesiol Scand Suppl 1985;81:7-10).The percutaneous insertion of a central venous catheter is an art perfected with gross anatomy knowledge and surface anatomy pearls; the technique is safe and efficient and complications are rare.

Ultrasound (US) guidance for central venous insertion was initially reported in the 1980s. It was used in patients with a history of failure or difficulties, unclear surface anatomy (e.g. obesity, burns), uncorrected coagulopathy, and neonates (JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 1987;11:505-6...

You do not currently have access to this content.