Chief of Pediatric Anesthesia at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) from 1955 to 1972, Leonard Bachman, M.D. (photograph, left), built a department dedicated to patients. His wife, artist Sarah J. Bachman (photograph, right), inspired his philosophy that “a physician uses the sciences as the tools of art just as an artist uses light, pigments, or clay.” Sarah was talented in several media, but it was her 1969 linoleum print (left), Fifth and Lombard, that best captured their Philadelphia neighborhood during a pivotal time in his career at CHOP. In 1967, Leonard and his colleague John “Jack” Downes, M.D., founded the first pediatric intensive care unit in the United States. Early on, Bachman administered ether in the emergency department to stabilize an asthmatic child with respiratory failure. Without this innovative application of anesthetic technique outside the operating room, the child might have perished. Inspired by this creative use of anesthesia, Bachman and Downes would one day envision integrating anesthetic tools into specialized hospital wards. Not only a muse for artistic innovations in medicine, Sarah grounded Leonard’s life. Their marriage of artist and physician fashioned a 55-yr valentine between art and science! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. www.woodlibrarymuseum.org)

Chief of Pediatric Anesthesia at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) from 1955 to 1972, Leonard Bachman, M.D. (photograph, left), built a department dedicated to patients. His wife, artist Sarah J. Bachman (photograph, right), inspired his philosophy that “a physician uses the sciences as the tools of art just as an artist uses light, pigments, or clay.” Sarah was talented in several media, but it was her 1969 linoleum print (left), Fifth and Lombard, that best captured their Philadelphia neighborhood during a pivotal time in his career at CHOP. In 1967, Leonard and his colleague John “Jack” Downes, M.D., founded the first pediatric intensive care unit in the United States. Early on, Bachman administered ether in the emergency department to stabilize an asthmatic child with respiratory failure. Without this innovative application of anesthetic technique outside the operating room, the child might have perished. Inspired by this creative use of anesthesia, Bachman and Downes would one day envision integrating anesthetic tools into specialized hospital wards. Not only a muse for artistic innovations in medicine, Sarah grounded Leonard’s life. Their marriage of artist and physician fashioned a 55-yr valentine between art and science! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. www.woodlibrarymuseum.org)

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Melissa L. Coleman, M.D., Associate Professor, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, and Leonard Bachman, M.D., Former Professor, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.