Reading about the childhood and later-life experiences of eminent scientists is always fascinating, allowing the reader to gain insight into the forces—including serendipity—that led to transformative accomplishments. Arguably, these influences may be particularly intriguing when the protagonists are women who ascended to the pinnacle of their profession despite systemic inequity.

Coauthored by an immunologist, Dr. Catherine Whitlock, and an astrophysicist, Dr. Rhodri Evans, Ten Women Who Changed Science and the World chronicles in telling detail the resistance that most, if not all, of the women scientists encountered in forging their career path. Although these extraordinary women shared the commonalities of brilliance, insatiable curiosity, resilience, and grit, their experiences differed to a certain extent. They came from assorted cultures and backgrounds, with their sagas representing American, Chinese, and diverse European vagaries. Some were blessed with parents and teachers who encouraged their professional pursuits, while others were dissuaded by these same authority...

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