We sincerely thank Jan van Egmond et al. for their interest in our review articles2,3  and relevant comments. We entirely agree that atelectasis is a prominent clinical issue and that there is great need for intervention methods to mitigate it. We also concur that negative pressure ventilation can increase the end-expiratory lung volume as observed with delivery of continuous negative extrathoracic pressure in healthy adults and anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits. Continuous negative abdominal pressure has also been reported to selectively recruit dorsal atelectatic lung and correspondingly increase the volume of ventilated lung in animal models under general anesthesia.6,7  Accordingly, negative pleural pressure could resolve peripheral airway closure and atelectasis if that closure is secondary to insufficient transpulmonary pressures.

Of note, our reviews are focused on perioperative pulmonary atelectasis. As detailed in the reviews, abdominal and thoracic surgery are particularly relevant in...

You do not currently have access to this content.