In the 1960s, sociologist Everett Rogers puzzled over why farmers, when confronted with the opportunity to use superior seeds, decided to keep using the seeds they had always used. His observations formed the underpinnings of his diffusion of innovations theory, which explains how technologic innovations came to be adopted across populations. Diffusion of innovations is one of the foundational theories of implementation science, the discipline concerned with promoting the uptake of evidence-based interventions meant to improve health. Perhaps, similar to Rogers, anesthesia professionals have puzzled over why evidence-based interventions in perioperative care—examples include the use of active warming during general anesthesia and the use of protocols and checklists to structure team processes—are not consistently used in practice.

In this issue of Anesthesiology, Weigel et al. tackle the adoption of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring, an evidence-based practice shown to decrease the incidence of residual weakness after the...

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